1. peashooter85:

Fun History Fact,
Unlike their depiction in the film The Last Samurai, the Samurai of the Satsuma Rebellion were armed with British and Russian rifles, revolvers, 30 cannon, and 30 mortars.

    peashooter85:

    Fun History Fact,

    Unlike their depiction in the film The Last Samurai, the Samurai of the Satsuma Rebellion were armed with British and Russian rifles, revolvers, 30 cannon, and 30 mortars.

  2. (Source: melancholyinside)

  3. tricountyshit:

priceofliberty:

Selfies of internet’s latest bad boy, Mexican hitman Broly Banderas 
Members of Mexican drug cartels are becoming increasingly visual online, posting violent footage of people decapitating victims with machetes and chainsaws, parading a collection of gold-plated weaponry, and all the while maintaining a sultry pout.
According to Vice, cartels are “harnessing” the power of social media to advertise their activities, instil fear and attract legions of new fans. Mexican authorities have been slow to introduce cyber laws to regulate criminal activity - and Mexico’s underworld have been quick to adapt.
Enter Broly Banderas, a member of the Knights Templar gunmen in Michoacán Mexico and the internet’s latest bad boy.
Banderas is reported to have participated in the slaughter of at least 50 policemen in a bid to eradicate community policing. Residents also claim he was responsible for bringing down one of the Federal Police’s army of helicopters. He is said to have described himself as an “assassin”.
In one selfie he is seen posing in the front of a vehicle while a blindfolded man - believed to be a kidnapped road worker - sits in the back. The victim’s body is seen in a later picture, dumped on the side of a road.
But where is Banderas now? Reports are that he was captured and killed, yet others say he’s still alive. We may have to wait for the next selfie to find out.

congested-highways

    tricountyshit:

    priceofliberty:

    Selfies of internet’s latest bad boy, Mexican hitman Broly Banderas

    Members of Mexican drug cartels are becoming increasingly visual online, posting violent footage of people decapitating victims with machetes and chainsaws, parading a collection of gold-plated weaponry, and all the while maintaining a sultry pout.

    According to Vice, cartels are “harnessing” the power of social media to advertise their activities, instil fear and attract legions of new fans. Mexican authorities have been slow to introduce cyber laws to regulate criminal activity - and Mexico’s underworld have been quick to adapt.

    Enter Broly Banderas, a member of the Knights Templar gunmen in Michoacán Mexico and the internet’s latest bad boy.

    Banderas is reported to have participated in the slaughter of at least 50 policemen in a bid to eradicate community policing. Residents also claim he was responsible for bringing down one of the Federal Police’s army of helicopters. He is said to have described himself as an “assassin”.

    In one selfie he is seen posing in the front of a vehicle while a blindfolded man - believed to be a kidnapped road worker - sits in the back. The victim’s body is seen in a later picture, dumped on the side of a road.

    But where is Banderas now? Reports are that he was captured and killed, yet others say he’s still alive. We may have to wait for the next selfie to find out.

    congested-highways

  4. (Source: kropotkindersurprise)

  5. babylonian:

aerostarmonk:

One time Matt Damon guest starred on Arthur and he looked horrifying.

"so should we draw Matt as a human or as an aardvark?"
"yes"

    babylonian:

    aerostarmonk:

    One time Matt Damon guest starred on Arthur and he looked horrifying.

    "so should we draw Matt as a human or as an aardvark?"

    "yes"

  6. fissurina:

    The Forgotten 1950s Girl Gang

    No idea if this photo set is already here somewhere…it likely is…but this is a bit rad…
    full article here: http://www.messynessychic.com/2013/02/10/the-forgotten-1950s-girl-gang/
    _———————————————

    You might have heard of the Teddy Boys, a 1950s rebel youth subculture in Britain characterized by an unlikely style of dress inspired by Edwardian dandies fused with American rock’n roll. They formed gangs from East London to North Kensington and became high profile rebels in the media. But an important sub-subculture of the Teddy Boys, an unlikely female element, has remained all but invisible from historical records. Meet The Teddy Girls.

    These are one of just a few known collections of documented photographs of the first British female youth culture ever to exist. In 1955, freelance photographer Ken Russell was introduced Josie Buchan, a Teddy Girl who introduced him to some of her friends. Russell photographed them and one other group in Notting Hill.

    After his photographs were published in a small magazine in 1955, Russell’s photographs remained unseen for over half a century. He became a successful film director in the meantime. In 2005, his archive was rediscovered, and so were the Teddy Girls.

    Russell remembers 14 year-old Teddy Girl, Jean Rayner: “She had attitude by the truckload. No one paid much attention to the teddy girls before I did them, though there was plenty on teddy boys. They were tough, these kids, they’d been born in the war years and food rationing only ended in about 1954 – a year before I took these pictures. They were proud. They knew their worth. They just wore what they wore.”

    To understand the Teddy Girls style, we first have to go back to the boys culture. They emerged in England as post-war austerity was coming to an end and working class teenagers were able to afford good clothes and began to adopt the upper class Saville Row revival of dandy Edwardian fashion. By the mid 1950s, second-hand Edwardian suits were readily available on sale in markets as they had become unwearable by the upper-class once the Teddy Boys had started sporting them. The Teds, as they called themselves, wore long drape jackets, velvet collars, slim ties and began to pair the look with thick rubber-soled creeper shoes and the ‘greaser’ hairstyles of their American rock’n’roll idols.

    Despite their overall gentlemanly style of dress (certainly compared to today), the Teddys were a teenage youth culture out to shock their parents’ generation, and quickly became associated with trouble by the media.

    Teddy girls were mostly working class teens as well, but considered less interesting by the media who were more concerned with sensationalizing a violent working class youth culture. While Teddy boys were known for hanging around on street corners, looking for trouble, a young working class woman’s role at the time was still focused around the home.

    But even with lower wages than the boys, Teddy girls would still dress up in their own drape jackets, rolled-up jeans, flat shoes, tailored jackets with velvet collars and put their feminine spin on the Teddy style with straw boater hats, brooches, espadrilles and elegant clutch bags. They would go to the cinema in groups and attend dances and concerts with the boys, collect rock’n’roll records and magazines. Together, they essentially cultivated the first market for teenage leisure in Britain.

    In the end it was the troublesome reputation of the Teddy Boys that got the better of this youth subculture. Most of the violence and vandalism was exaggerated by the media, but there were notably a few gangs that chose a darker path.

  7. feriowind:

    :V originally from my kaiju clock, but yeah, will be turning these guys into stickers! might include a breach sticker, and possibly some other misc. things too idk

    they’re also transparent ahuuhuuhuu

  8. (Source: meowskeeez)

  9. artsytoad:

Bernie Wrightson, Asparagus Dream

    artsytoad:

    Bernie Wrightson, Asparagus Dream

  10. Dealing With Dead People - Banishing & Exorcism →

    breelandwalker:

    For those of us who deal with the dead on a semi-regular basis, the phenomenon of being visited or “followed home” is probably not too unfamiliar. For those who don’t engage in spirit work or who aren’t familiar with the paranormal, the experience is a good deal more unsettling. Either way, one of…

  11. abystle:

St. Francis Borgia performing an exorcism, Francisco de Goya, 1788.

    abystle:

    St. Francis Borgia performing an exorcism, Francisco de Goya, 1788.

  12. ayumi-nemera:

    "In the northwest of France, near Nantes and Le Mans, there is a Roman Catholic church which added sci-fi gargoyles to its exterior during a restoration in 1993 and 1995. Called the Chapelle de Bathléem, two of its five pinnacles were restored with gargoyles of a Xenomorph, Gizmo, a Gremlin, Grendizer from Mazinger, and the King of the Dead (Ankou) for good measure. Better yet, this church is officially listed among monuments historiques. Damn right it is.

    The church was built in the Middle Ages on a site where Druids held Beltane fertility ceremonies. The pinnacles of the church had fallen into disrepair, losing 28 of the chimeras adorning the corners of the chapel’s five pinnacles. They didn’t have a clear record of what was originally carved in those places, so they hired sculptor Jean-Louis Boistel to add new gargoyles based on Christian mythology as well as modern symbols from American film and Japanese animation.”

  13. astronomy-to-zoology:

    Genus: Beaus

    Beaus is an unusual genus of small Platygastrid wasps that occur worldwide. Adult Beaus spp. are unbelievably small and are parasitize on egg sacs of spiders of the family Lycosidae. Female Beaus spp. are wingless and phoretic, ‘riding’ on the female spider until her eggs are laid. The female will then lay her eggs inside the spider’s egg, the female wasps’s larvae will then develop inside the eggs until they reach adulthood. 

    Classification

    Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Hymenoptera-Platygastroidea-Platygastridae-Scelioninae-Baeus

    Images: ©tom murray and ©Ashley Bradford

  14. (Source: mesonoxianherald)

  15. worsethanmyotherblog:

Water elemental.

    worsethanmyotherblog:

    Water elemental.