shmemson:

johnnyideaseed:

daveboogie:

Here is a pic of Grace Jones shoving cake into Divine’s mouth at what I believe was Grace’s 30th birthday party…you’re welcome!

It’s like “The Creation of Adam,” but relevant to my interests.

I want this poster-sized and framed in my home.

shmemson:

johnnyideaseed:

daveboogie:

Here is a pic of Grace Jones shoving cake into Divine’s mouth at what I believe was Grace’s 30th birthday party…you’re welcome!

It’s like “The Creation of Adam,” but relevant to my interests.

I want this poster-sized and framed in my home.

dichotomized:

Howard Lang offered a cigarette to his 7-year-old playmate, Lonnie Fellick, and then casually informed him: “That will be the last one you ever smoke.” In the presence of a third boy, 9-year-old old Gerald Michalek, Lang threw Fellick to the ground and attacked him with a switchblade and a heavy stone in Thatcher Woods, northwest of Chicago. Satisfied that Lonnie was dead, Lang and his friend covered the body with leaves. Howard Lang was only 12-years-old when he murdered Fellick on October 18, 1947. The young suspect attended classes at the Von Humboldt Grammar School on the city’s far northwest side. Lang had a 17-year-old girlfriend named Anna Mae Evans, who hid the his blood-stained clothes. Lang giggled as he reconstructed the murder for the police. The three boys took a streetcar to the forest preserve and walked to Thatcher Woods. “Lonnie asked me for a cigarette and I gave him one, and then he said he was going to tell my mother that I took $10 of her money.” That’s when Lang noticed the thirty-five-pound concrete boulder imbedded in the ground. Howard knocked Lonnie to the ground, stabbed him, and then crushed him with the stone. Gerald Michalek told police what happened next. “Howie told me to hold his legs or else I’d get it the same way. I thought Lonnie was breathing but I was sure he’d die. I covered him with the leaves.” The two boys went to the home of Anna Evans, who refused to believe the story. The next day, she and two older boys went to the forest to see for themselves. Anna took Lonnie’s blood-soaked clothes with her and hid them in the woods. The police and the state’s attorney believed that Lang knew what he was doing and they pressed for a murder indictment. The boy was eventually convicted, but the decision was reversed by the Illinois Supreme Court on April 27, 1949. The ruling was handed down by the Judge who exmplained that Lang was too young to be able to distinguish between right or wrong. As a result he was acquitted of all charges.
Zoom Info
dichotomized:

Howard Lang offered a cigarette to his 7-year-old playmate, Lonnie Fellick, and then casually informed him: “That will be the last one you ever smoke.” In the presence of a third boy, 9-year-old old Gerald Michalek, Lang threw Fellick to the ground and attacked him with a switchblade and a heavy stone in Thatcher Woods, northwest of Chicago. Satisfied that Lonnie was dead, Lang and his friend covered the body with leaves. Howard Lang was only 12-years-old when he murdered Fellick on October 18, 1947. The young suspect attended classes at the Von Humboldt Grammar School on the city’s far northwest side. Lang had a 17-year-old girlfriend named Anna Mae Evans, who hid the his blood-stained clothes. Lang giggled as he reconstructed the murder for the police. The three boys took a streetcar to the forest preserve and walked to Thatcher Woods. “Lonnie asked me for a cigarette and I gave him one, and then he said he was going to tell my mother that I took $10 of her money.” That’s when Lang noticed the thirty-five-pound concrete boulder imbedded in the ground. Howard knocked Lonnie to the ground, stabbed him, and then crushed him with the stone. Gerald Michalek told police what happened next. “Howie told me to hold his legs or else I’d get it the same way. I thought Lonnie was breathing but I was sure he’d die. I covered him with the leaves.” The two boys went to the home of Anna Evans, who refused to believe the story. The next day, she and two older boys went to the forest to see for themselves. Anna took Lonnie’s blood-soaked clothes with her and hid them in the woods. The police and the state’s attorney believed that Lang knew what he was doing and they pressed for a murder indictment. The boy was eventually convicted, but the decision was reversed by the Illinois Supreme Court on April 27, 1949. The ruling was handed down by the Judge who exmplained that Lang was too young to be able to distinguish between right or wrong. As a result he was acquitted of all charges.
Zoom Info

dichotomized:

Howard Lang offered a cigarette to his 7-year-old playmate, Lonnie Fellick, and then casually informed him: “That will be the last one you ever smoke.” In the presence of a third boy, 9-year-old old Gerald Michalek, Lang threw Fellick to the ground and attacked him with a switchblade and a heavy stone in Thatcher Woods, northwest of Chicago. Satisfied that Lonnie was dead, Lang and his friend covered the body with leaves. Howard Lang was only 12-years-old when he murdered Fellick on October 18, 1947. The young suspect attended classes at the Von Humboldt Grammar School on the city’s far northwest side. Lang had a 17-year-old girlfriend named Anna Mae Evans, who hid the his blood-stained clothes. Lang giggled as he reconstructed the murder for the police. The three boys took a streetcar to the forest preserve and walked to Thatcher Woods. “Lonnie asked me for a cigarette and I gave him one, and then he said he was going to tell my mother that I took $10 of her money.” That’s when Lang noticed the thirty-five-pound concrete boulder imbedded in the ground. Howard knocked Lonnie to the ground, stabbed him, and then crushed him with the stone. Gerald Michalek told police what happened next. “Howie told me to hold his legs or else I’d get it the same way. I thought Lonnie was breathing but I was sure he’d die. I covered him with the leaves.” The two boys went to the home of Anna Evans, who refused to believe the story. The next day, she and two older boys went to the forest to see for themselves. Anna took Lonnie’s blood-soaked clothes with her and hid them in the woods. The police and the state’s attorney believed that Lang knew what he was doing and they pressed for a murder indictment. The boy was eventually convicted, but the decision was reversed by the Illinois Supreme Court on April 27, 1949. The ruling was handed down by the Judge who exmplained that Lang was too young to be able to distinguish between right or wrong. As a result he was acquitted of all charges.

sixpenceee:

The Urididae is a type of moth and it’s cocoon is a bright orange color, that sometimes looks golden. The cocoon is usually suspended on a long thread below a leaf. 
The net structure of the cocoon allows for more airflow over the pupa. This prevent fungus and mold from being able to grow on it.
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

The Urididae is a type of moth and it’s cocoon is a bright orange color, that sometimes looks golden. The cocoon is usually suspended on a long thread below a leaf. 

The net structure of the cocoon allows for more airflow over the pupa. This prevent fungus and mold from being able to grow on it.

SOURCE